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Scientific Paper

Nano ES GEMMA and PDMA, New Tools for the Analysis of Nanobioparticles—Protein Complexes, Lipoparticles, and Viruses

Reference Type:Journal Article
Author:Allmaier, Günter;Laschober, Christian;Szymanski, Wladyslaw W.
Author Addresses:Institute of Chemical Technologies and Analytics, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna, AustriaFaculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria
Title:Nano ES GEMMA and PDMA, New Tools for the Analysis of Nanobioparticles—Protein Complexes, Lipoparticles, and Viruses
Secondary Title:Journal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry
Periodical Title:Journal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry
Pages:1062-1068
Volume:19
Number:8
Year:2008
Publishing Date: 31.05.2008
ISBN:1044-0305
Related URLs:http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1044030508004388

Differential mobility analysis (DMA) is a technique suited for size analysis as well as preparative collection of airborne nanosized airborne particles. In the recent decade, the analysis of intact viruses, proteins, DNA fragments, polymers, and inorganic nanoparticles was possible when combining this method with a nano-electrospray charge-reduction source for producing aerosols from a sample solution/suspensions. Mass analysis of high molecular weight noncovalent complexes is also possible with this methodology due to the linear correlation of the electrophoretic mobility diameter and the molecular mass. In this work, we present the analysis (size and molecular mass) of high molecular weight multimers (noncovalent functional homocomplex) of Jack bean urease in a mass range from 275 kDa up to 2.5 MDa, with mainly present tri- and hexamers but also higher oligomers of the 91 kDa monomer subunit. In a second experiment, the size analysis of intact very-low-density (∼35 nm), low-density (∼22 nm) and high-density lipoparticles (∼10 nm), which are heterocomplexes consisting of cholesterol, lipids, and proteins in different ratios, is presented. Results from mobility analysis were in excellent agreement with particle diameters found in literature. The last presented experiment demonstrates size analysis of a rod-like virus and selective sampling of a selected size fraction of electrosprayed, singly-charged tobacco mosaic virus particles. Sampling and subsequent transmission electron microscopic investigations of a specific size fraction (40 nm electrophoretic mobility diameter) revealed the folding of virus particles during the electrospray and charge reduction (electrical stress) as well as solvent evaporation (mechanical stress) process, leading to an observed geometry of 150 (length) × 35 (width) nm (average cylindrical geometry of unsprayed intact virus 300 × 18 nm).

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